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Keith Dawson

'Path-Gate' Teaches Hard Lessons in Mobile Privacy

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kdawson
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Re: Path Deleted Data
kdawson   2/22/2012 5:19:29 PM
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Pretty much all Web businesses take to themselves the right to change their terms of service at will and without proactive notification. It's up to the product, er the customers to go seek it out and then try to make a meaningful comparison with whatever came before, if they can even find it.

vrs400
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Re: Shocked!
vrs400   2/22/2012 3:01:20 PM
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@kdawson,

Thanks for the additional information! I really hope this iOS pushed update and a scramble to change Apple's terms banning companies from taking this confidential information is enforced immediately. I wait impatiently for an update. Meanwhile if my contacts and I start receiving unsolicited phone calls I guess we'll know why (sold information to marketers).

munira
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Re: Path Deleted Data
munira   2/18/2012 9:59:00 AM
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Cassimir I agree with you on that part, once a personal thing or info is shared its not private anymore even with siblings or closest friends. In the same way social networking platforms are out there for business, they will use all means to expand their audience and for that personal information on hand is a handy option. Now how they use the info or sell it off should be questionable, which should not be done without prior permission.

kdawson
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Re: Shocked!
kdawson   2/18/2012 7:52:43 AM
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@vrs — Apple has said they are working on a fix. Most observers believe this will come in the form of an iOS update, pushed out to everyone, that will enforce asking permission before touching the address book.

A post up at Ars Technica goes into some detail about what this could look like. There are UI issues — an app doesn't want to present the user with a permission screen for location, then another for address book, then another for the Twitter account, and another for Push Notifications. Also, Apple could (some would say "should") provide access only to salted & hashed addresses, for greaer security and user privacy.

vrs400
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Shocked!
vrs400   2/17/2012 11:18:08 PM
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"The companies identified included Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Foursquare, Foodspotting, Yelp, and Gowalla.

Most, if not all, of the companies that had been uploading address book data in any form have now publicly backed away from the practice."


In other words, if I'm understanding this correctly, companies still have the technical capability to do this, and big companies pointed to by Henry Waxman may undoubtably fix these privacy issues, but others probably won't unless forced to by Apple. Users won't be protected, from my understanding, until another version of iOS is rolled out and companies consent to full policy compliance. Unbelievable. How it is that address book information didn't manage to be considered "confidential" is mind boggling. Thanks for keeping us all at Business Agility informed, Keith Dawson!

Tom Murphy
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Re: Respectful sharing
Tom Murphy   2/17/2012 4:27:53 PM
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Thanks Keith for that list. I'm going check out some of those. In the meantime, I sense there's an opportunity now that the public is growing aware of this. Maybe the time for those networks is only starting to arrive now.... 
I imagine one obstacle was finding a business model for it. Well, if Facebook is worth $100 billion because it gathers data and uses it to target ads, maybe a nonprofit network could generate enough cash to support its own growth -- say a paltry $20 million -- by selling untargeted ads.  (Fun Fact: Wikipedia is the world's 8th largest website and the only nonprofit in the Top 25. It has fewer than two dozen employees.)

kdawson
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Sharing as the norm
kdawson   2/17/2012 1:58:12 PM
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@Hammad, that is exactly what Mark Zuckerberg talks about. He believes himself to be a man ahead of his time, pushing social expectations until greater sharing is the norm.

kdawson
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Respectful sharing
kdawson   2/17/2012 1:55:50 PM
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@Tom, I would love to believe you're correct, but I'm not hopeful about the idea of a privacy-respecting social network. For one thing, several of these exist, and mostly nobody has heard of them. Remember Diaspora? Heard of Status.net, Appleseed, buddycloud, Friendica, Knowee, SocialRiver? (Many others here.) Nobody goes there because nobody goes there.

Hammad Masood
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Re: Path Deleted Data
Hammad Masood   2/17/2012 1:36:23 PM
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What  i have noticed is that more of data we share on social media, the more it becomes the "norm" for society,meaning for society as a whole, it lowers what is considered to be reasonable.

Tom Murphy
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Re: Path Deleted Data
Tom Murphy   2/17/2012 11:08:28 AM
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I think people are just starting to wake up -- far too late -- to the privacy issue. We're also, really, still at the dawn of the social media era.  I don't think it will be long before we see a popular social network that prevents the collection and sharing of information with vendors, perhaps as an open source, nonprofit operation.  That could become very popular and eventually undermine the current business models based on directed advertising. I wonder how Facebook and other companies would respond...

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