HOME  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGE BOARDS  |  AUDIO  |  VIDEO  |  WEBCASTS  |  RESOURCES  |  ABOUT US
Tom Murphy

Big Data for Small Players

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
munira
User Rank
Agile Expert
Re: Keeping It Small: Not Always a Bad Thing
munira   3/24/2012 6:15:27 AM
NO RATINGS
I agree Apple is one great example of being agile, competitive and admistratively in sync within departments, in comparaison to Nokia which has been trying hard to mark its impression as far as smart phones are concerned. They not only lack coordination but also lack vision for research at the moment. This administrative flaw has brought Nokia down in consumer market and has lost its many faithful customers to Apple and Samsung.

Agile
User Rank
Agile Expert
Re: Keeping It Small: Not Always a Bad Thing
Agile   3/23/2012 12:17:39 PM
NO RATINGS

Great analogy Tom,  It is truly impressive what Apple is able to do in terms of logistics and managing all the moving parts.   I have never really seen project management as successful as Apple practices it.  And I really believe Agility is the difference maker when all other factors have been addressed.

Those who are quickest to adapt to changing conditions of the marketplace reap the benefits associated with the effort.  


Tom Murphy
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Keeping It Small: Not Always a Bad Thing
Tom Murphy   3/23/2012 11:31:15 AM
NO RATINGS
The smaller a company is, the more agile it is. A single entrepreneur can spin on a dime. A big corporation is often like an ocean liner, which can require miles to stop or make a turn. The trick is to get big without losing that agility. Isn't it remarkable that Apple can introduce a new version of the iPhone about once a year? Think of all the things have to fall into place to make that happen -- engineering, design, software, suppliers, manufacturing (in those dubious Chinese factories), shipping, retail shelf space, not to mention all the administration behind it all. What if one piece falls out of place?

Agility. That's really what this site is all about.

Agile
User Rank
Agile Expert
Keeping It Small: Not Always a Bad Thing
Agile   3/21/2012 12:52:07 PM
NO RATINGS

I really love how disciplines for the most part can be package so even the smallest companies can use it.  It is easy to think you need a high priced analyst to "rule the data quest" but the facts are - small business owners themselves can champion the effort.  

"Getting the first five people is easy, but the next 20 is hard when you are selling on your vision and momentum."

I really like this statement - and maybe keeping it small is good.


kdawson
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Transition time
kdawson   3/21/2012 11:13:11 AM
NO RATINGS
Yep, HFT seems to have qualitatively changed the fundamental characteristics of a market mechanism that had worked, in some form, for 350 years. (I'm thinking of the pre-tulip traders in Amsterdam in the mid-17th century.)

Tom Murphy
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Transition time
Tom Murphy   3/21/2012 11:10:46 AM
NO RATINGS
This is quickly changing the nature of investment. It used to be that ordinary people put money in the stock market, invested for the long term, and earned substantial returns for accepting more risk. Last year, however, as hedge funds and large institutional investors made fortunes through this sort of programmed trading, the Dow Jones Industrial Average finished the year where it began in -- meaning long-term investors didn't make a nickel.  Trading based on speculation by a machine isn't a sound basis for the companies that depend on the cash.

kdawson
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Transition time
kdawson   3/20/2012 6:32:38 PM
NO RATINGS
In this case they are machines trying to do thousands, tens, hundreds of thousands of transactions per second. A millisecond is an eternity to these algorithms.

munira
User Rank
Agile Expert
Re: Transition time
munira   3/20/2012 1:09:46 PM
NO RATINGS
Speed, seconds, mili seconds matter when the competition is tough and its a nail biting fight. Businesses are run globally and at times the response time is all that matters, having machines available to do big calculations upto penny level can make a difference in decision making.

Tom Murphy
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Transition time
Tom Murphy   3/20/2012 11:41:54 AM
NO RATINGS
@Keith: You're right. The exchanges are actually leasing computer space inside their trading operations so that brokerages can plant their servers there, shaving microseconds off each trade. Needless to say, the exchanges can charge a LOT for such space; it may be the most expensive real estate in the world.

kdawson
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Transition time
kdawson   3/20/2012 11:38:55 AM
NO RATINGS
High-frequuency trading is a mysterious world, as demonstrated by this abstract art generated by patterns of HFT captured by the folks at Zero Hedge, who set out to demonstrate market manipulation by the mechanism of HFT.

I also read somewhere about a trading company investing $30 million (I think it was) to move an office full of equipment from the 50s in Manhattan to the 30s; they expected to make it up, and profit besides, by being that many microseconds closer to the trading floor by speed-of-light travel.

Page 1 / 2   >   >>
More Blogs from Tom Murphy
IBM shows off an impressive Pure Applications as the high note of its Impact 2012 keynote session.
PureSystems may be the show-stealer as IBM hosts Impact2012 in Las Vegas this week.
After its dramatic fall from grace, agile Nokia is betting its future on the dark horse in the US phone market -- Windows.
US trade agency warns online companies to regulate their use of consumer data, or the government will step in to do it for them.
Asking job candidates for their Facebook password isnít just an invasion of privacy. It may have legal repercussions for your company.
Business Agility Twitter Feed
HOME  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGE BOARDS  |  AUDIO  |  VIDEO  |  EXECUTIVE FORUMS  |  WEBCASTS  |  RESOURCES  |  ABOUT US